COOL METAL SEATING STOOLS

COOL METAL SEATING STOOLS

Using recycle metal cans is what London designers Studio Swine used to build a line a line of metal stool with a mobile foundry to cast aluminum stools from drinks cans they collected on the streets of San Paulo.

Over 80 percent of the city’s recycling is collected informally on carts pulled by independent waste collectors known as catadores.  Studio Swine wanted to create a system that would help them recycle the rubbish they collect into products they can sell.

The pair collected discarded cans from a street vendor and used cooking oil for fuel to melt the aluminum on site, turning the street into an improvised manufacturing line. They made molds by pressing objects they found locally into sand collected from construction sites in the area.

The resulting stools have tops that bear the impressions of ventilation bricks, a palm leaf, the base of a basket, a hub cap and plastic tubing.Metal recycle stools from can city 1

Drink cans they collected on the streets of São Paulo

Cantoderes collect the cans to recycle

Unlike the conventional aluminum furniture, they’re each unique and expressive,” said the designers. “Manufactured on the spot, they transform ephemeral street materials into metal objects, providing a portrait of the street.“ Mining the city for materials, the perception of the city changes, where once you saw rubbish, now you can see resources to be transformed into new products.” said the designers.

Aluminium melting manufacturing on the spot

 

Manufactured on the Spot

Unlike the conventional aluminum furniture, they’re each unique and expressive,” said the designers. “Manufactured on the spot, they transform ephemeral street materials into metal objects, providing a portrait of the street. “Mining the city for materials, the perception of the city changes, where once you saw rubbish, now you can see resources to be transformed into new products.” said the designers.

melted aluminium made into metal stools

The Process

  • The project was commissioned by Coletivo Amor de Madre Gallery in São Paulo and involved working with several catadore co-operatives to find both the materials to make the furnace, and the oil and cans to use it.
  • The resulting stools were donated to the vendor who provided the cooking oil and the furnace remains in São Paulo, where the project will continue with a new series of products and furniture made in a favela.
  • Each stool takes around 60 cans, but catadores collecting cans around a football stadium on a match day bring in many thousands of cans. “The idea is that catadores will share a furnace and greatly increase the amount of money they can get for the materials they collect.“
  • They suggest that the furnace can be used to cast anything to sell, including small items like souvenirs for the 2014 World Cup or 2016 Olympic Games. However, the potential of open sand casting lends itself very well to larger pieces and we are interested in how this can be incorporated into small scale architecture.

 

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